On the Road to Justice – Betrayal

Why .. after spending the last year trying to engage with the City of Muskegon – why did the City Commissioners approve an agreement with Disability Network West Michigan (DNWM) to represent Muskegon residents and visitors with disabilities and to guide the City in meeting the “minimum” requirements in the ADA?

Do you believe corporations are people? Is it possible for a corporation to represent a minority community? Should a non-disabled corporate employee speak for disabled residents? The idea is in conflict with the Independent Living philosophy mandated in DNWN’s federal funding.

Elected officials and public employees often ask why minorities perceive prejudice and discrimination, because in their hearts they believe they are not racist, not sexist, not ableist, not ageist. Even when a person experiencing minority status tells you they experience inequality, you can’t agree with what they are telling you, because you are not an “-ist.” How do you change something you can’t see, feel, hear, touch?

What’s wrong with this picture?

“Muskegon City Commission Worksession Chambers

August 12, 2019, MINUTES (PDF):

Present: Mayor Gawron, Vice-Mayor Hood (arrived 5:36), Commissioners Turnquist, Johnson, and German

Absent: Commissioners Rinsema-Sybenga and Warren

Disability Network of West Michigan – Brad Hastings, Presentation information to the City Commission regarding a proposed cooperation agreement. DNWM will help the City and its customers to meet the minimum requirements of the Construction Coded and the ADA and continue to education and influence toward implementing new best practices that incorporate Universal Design concepts. This will be accomplished by providing training and technical assistance to City staff and its customers. This work is aimed at increasing the inclusiveness and accessibility of our built environment and realizing the ultimate vision of access for all, regardless of ability…”

On the surface this ‘agreement’ sounds like it is a positive for the thousands of disabled residents in Muskegon. But in fact, it is a continuation of the prejudice and discrimination the disability community typically experiences in local government.

  1. DNWM is a corporate actor and Mr. Hastings is NOT a disabled person. He does not experience exclusion or inequality and he is not qualified to represent people who do.
  2. The work itself is important, but is he the most qualified person to do the work? Did the city solicit a proposal from a pre-determined provider, or did they put out a public request for proposals? Was the opportunity to contract with the city fairly offered to qualified people, or did it just go to a corporate representative of the chamber?

Twenty nine years of federal mandates to build disability-friendly cities and yet Muskegon’s central city has been torn down and re-built without the essential accessibility features. Should I be satisfied when the City of Muskegon hires a non-disabled adviser to create disability access? WTF.

Advertisements

Yes, the Penguin Project Is Ableist.

This Fall, the Penguin Project is coming to Muskegon. Local children and young adults with disabilities will be cast in a production of the musical “Annie, Jr.” that will run October 14 and 15, 2017 at the Frauenthal.

The Penguin Project describes itself as follows:

“The Penguin Project is a musical theater production that casts children and young adults with disabilities in all roles. All will sing, dance and act in the show. Those individuals (Artists) will get assistance from on-stage peers (Mentors). Who can participate? Artists are children and young adults (ages 10-22) with disabilities. Including (but not limited to) Down Syndrome, cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, visual impairment, hearing impairment and neurological disorders. Mentors are children and young adults (ages 10-22) who do not have disabilities. They will be matched with an artist of similar age and the two will work side-by-side.”

Text: It's called the Penguin Project because penguins can’t fly. Get it? Image: A confused penguin with a speech bubble that says "I use my wings for swimming and diving. I don’t need to change to meet your arbitrary definition of success.” #saynotoableismWhat is the reason that a person with a disability cannot be a mentor?

The disabled actors will be matched with “mentors,” who are specifically defined as non-disabled people. There is only one reason that people with disabilities cannot be a mentor: ableism.

The Penguin Project defeats its own goal by teaching children with disabilities that non-disabled people are their superiors, not their equals. They are being allowed to participate in an activity as long as they accept their role as a recipient of charity needing to be mentored by non-disabled people. That’s not what we want our kids to learn.  Continue reading